Archived — 2014–15 Report on Plans and Priorities

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Section II: Analysis of Programs by Strategic Outcomes

Strategic Outcome: A Competitive Southern Ontario Economy

As the operating environment for FedDev Ontario continues to evolve, the focus has been on mitigating the challenges of a complex global marketplace by capitalizing on the region's assets including: a well-educated and diverse population; an excellent network of higher learning institutions; a business-friendly environment; a vibrant small business community; key economic clusters; and close proximity and access to the U.S. and international markets.

FedDev Ontario will continue working to build upon these assets to improve the competitiveness of the southern Ontario economy, focusing its efforts in 2014–15 on four program areas: Technological Innovation; Business Development; Community Economic Development; and Internal Services. Through these programs, the Agency delivers key programs, initiatives and services to individuals, businesses, communities, and other key stakeholders across southern Ontario and strengthens its profile as a viable partner in economic development.

Program Alignment Architecture (PAA) for FedDev Ontario

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Program 1.1: Technological Innovation

Description:

This program area is intended to support the southern Ontario economy to be more innovative by creating new products, services, processes and markets so as to contribute to the region's competitiveness objectives. This will be achieved by: encouraging the region's labour force to be more innovative; focusing on key emerging sectors; and by strengthening linkages between the region's businesses especially small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and its post-secondary institutions. These are the elements necessary to improve the region's productivity, accelerate economic growth and maintain and enhance the region's living standards in the context of a global knowledge-based economy. Transfer payments in support of this program area are made through the administration of contribution agreements under the Investing in Commercialization Partnerships (ICP) initiative and the new Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF).Footnote 4

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)Footnote 5
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
79,171,993 79,171,993 79,154,516 79,132,992
Human Resources (FTEs)Footnote 6
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
22 22 22
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Southern Ontario businesses are working in partnership to invest in research and new technologies Number of people in the labour force in southern Ontario that are considered "highly qualified personnel" Footnote a, Footnote b 2,269,200 people 2015–03–31
Share of Ontario's employment in Knowledge-Intensive Business Services (KIBS) Footnote c 6.1%
Footnotes
Footnote a

Data for this indicator is based on nine economic regions identified by Statistics Canada that make up southern Ontario. These regions align with 37 census divisions identified as part of the Agency's mandate, except that the census division of Muskoka is included in one of the nine economic regions.

Return to footnote a referrer

Footnote b

Highly-skilled personnel is defined by Statistics Canada as "individuals with university degrees at the bachelors'[sic] level and above." (Michael McKenzie, "A Profile of Canada's Highly Qualified People," Innovation Analysis Bulletin, 9, 2 (October 9, 2007), 29–32).

Return to footnote b referrer

Footnote c

The KIBS subsector includes establishments whose primary activities depend on human capital, knowledge, and skills. The KIBS final product is a consulting service and knowledge transfer. Other than being intensive, these services are intermediary (i.e., services included for business).

Return to footnote c referrer

Planning Highlights

Developing an environment in which innovative ideas can thrive and be transformed into globally-competitive products and services is a necessary pre-condition for bridging the gap between innovation and commercialization in Canada. Through this program, FedDev Ontario aims to capitalize on the collective assets and knowledge of collaborations involving SMEs, post-secondary institutions, not-for-profit organizations, research institutions, and industrial organizations to bring innovative products, technologies and services more quickly to the global marketplace.

FedDev Ontario will build on the relationships it established through its previous suite of programming and continue to work with key stakeholders in 2014–15 to support the creation of innovative products and technologies and the business-led partnerships that are best-equipped to expedite these efforts to the market, domestically and internationally. As part of its renewal efforts, the Agency has developed new programming to reflect key areas and priorities, as well as feedback received from stakeholders and partners, in support of this program. Accordingly, the Agency will focus its investments in 2014–15 primarily on the Technology Development and Commercialization sub-program area of the PAA, set out in more detail below.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Technology Development and Commercialization

Description:

This sub-program provides non-repayable and repayable contributions to not-for-profit organizations, businesses (particularly those in the manufacturing sector) and/or post-secondary institutions to help support the commercialization of new products and spur innovation. This is achieved through funding collaborative ventures, which bring together and leverage the skill sets of various economic players to bring innovative ideas to market. This sub-program is key, given one of the main challenges facing the southern Ontario economy has been that many innovations are never commercialized. As a result, there is a real need to encourage collaboration so that post-secondary institutions, businesses (especially SMEs), and not-for-profit corporations can leverage their knowledge and skills to bring innovations to market faster and help the southern Ontario and Canadian economies be more globally competitive.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
77,708,444 77,691,291 77,670,164
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
13 13 13
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 7
Southern Ontario businesses are able to bring innovative ideas to market Ratio of collaborations leveraged per project 4:1 2019–03–31
Percentage of project costs directed to R&D 60%

Planning Highlights

Fostering the development of innovative ecosystems or collaborative arrangements that can bring emerging ideas to market is key to the long-term competitiveness of the southern Ontario economy. The newly-launched Investing in Commercialization Partnerships (ICP) will provide non-repayable contributions to post-secondary institutions and not-for-profit organizations to support existing and emerging innovation ecosystems within southern Ontario that collaborate with the private sector to create and commercialize innovative products, technologies, and services.

In 2014–15, FedDev Ontario intends to build on the relationships and networks developed through the recently completed Technology Development Program (TDP), Applied Research and Commercialization (ARC) initiative, and Prosperity Initiative (Building a Competitive Advantage). Moving forward, the Agency will continue to support business-led projects with a focus on developing products, platforms, and services with demonstrated commercial value. It will also work with recipients of its Technology Development Program (TDP), Applied Research and Commercialization (ARC), and Prosperity Initiative (PI) programming to gather and report on performance data and work towards the closure of project files.

Another priority area for the Agency is southern Ontario's manufacturing sector, which has been identified as critical to Canada's prosperity due to the potential for providing high-quality and well-paying jobs and its historical investments in research and development. While Ontario manufacturing firms have competitive advantages in some knowledge-intensive sectors, they lag behind competitors in innovation, Information and Communications Technology (ICT) adoption, productivity, and market diversification.

In 2014–15, the Agency's new Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF), launched in December 2013, will work with established for-profit businesses and not-for-profit organizations (e.g., research institutions, centres of excellence, and post-secondary institutions) throughout Ontario to support the long-term growth, productivity and competitiveness of the province's manufacturing sector. It will support large-scale and transformative advanced manufacturing activities; advance the development and/or adoption of cutting-edge technologies; encourage projects that have spillover benefits for manufacturing clusters and/or global supply chains; and work with key stakeholders to foster collaboration between the private sector, research and post-secondary institutions.

The Investing in Commercialization Partnerships (ICP) and Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF) are similar in design to the previous Technology Development Program (TDP) and Prosperity Initiative (Building a Competitive Advantage) in that they will support larger-scale projects with large dollar-values through a small number of projects. The anticipated impact, on average, is 4 significant collaborations with external partners per project. Through these collaborations the Agency's funding will leverage significant private sector investments to contribute to the advancement of innovative ideas to market. The Agency anticipates that there will be a small number of high-value projects involving a significant degree of complexity and, recognizing the requirements during its first mandate, the Agency is notionally allocating 13 FTEs to the delivery of this sub-program.

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Program 1.2: Business Development

Description:

This program supports the 360,000 businesses (especially SMEs) in southern Ontario in their efforts to drive competitiveness by providing funding for the creation of start-up companies, helping existing businesses expand and helping companies improve their productivity. Transfer payments in support of this program are made through the administration of contribution agreements with businesses, not-for-profit organizations and post-secondary institutions through a variety of initiatives under the Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI), including Investing in Business Innovation (IBI), Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP), and Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD).Footnote 8

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)Footnote 9
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
77,643,433 77,643,433 77,626,294 77,605,186
Human Resources (FTEs)Footnote 10
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
57 57 57
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Southern Ontario businesses are able to respond to future economic challenges Private investment in machinery and equipment in Ontario To support businesses to meet or exceed their 2014 investment intentionsFootnote d 2015–03–31
Ontario's Labour Productivity (real gross domestic product per hour) $44.78
Footnotes
Footnote d

Statistics Canada 2014 intention figures to be released February 26, 2014.

Return to footnote d referrer

Planning Highlights

Southern Ontario businesses, particularly in the manufacturing sector, continue to experience productivity challenges, difficulties growing their businesses domestically and internationally, challenges integrating into global value chains, and continue to lag behind international competitors in ICT adoption. Moreover, southern Ontario entrepreneurs working in high-growth firms continue to face difficulties accessing capital, developing the skills necessary to manage and lead a business, and accessing the expertise and connections they need to compete in the global economy.

Building on work completed as part of the Agency's first mandate, FedDev Ontario will deliver results in support of the Business Development Program through several new initiatives aimed at addressing the various structural, productivity, and access to capital challenges facing the southern Ontario economy. The new initiatives will build on two current sub-programs — Business Investment and Business Productivity and Innovation — which will run through to March 31, 2019. The Agency aims to address these issues to better position southern Ontario as a world leader in innovation and an important player in global value chains.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Business Investment

Description:

This sub-program is necessary because one of the largest challenges to the southern Ontario economy is the lack of access to capital by start-ups to help commercialize their ideas, particularly since the economic downturn. To remain competitive and be a leader in the knowledge-based economy, access to capital is necessary for the success of southern Ontario businesses and the overall economic prosperity of the region. The Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) initiative provides non-repayable contributions to not-for-profit organizations offering mentorship, entrepreneurial support and seed financing to help new businesses grow and succeed; as well as angel investor networks to encourage increased investment in new businesses. Repayable contributions are also provided to start-up businesses to accelerate the commercialization of new products, processes and practices by leveraging private sector investment.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
20,955,466 20,950,840 20,945,143
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
6 6 6
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 11
Southern Ontario entrepreneurs have access to capital to help commercialize new products, processes, or systems Number of new (i.e., start-up) businesses accessing capital 250 2019–03–31
Total value of new investments attracted to Angel Networks $5M per angel network project
Dollars leveraged against FedDev Ontario contribution $2:1 ratio for direct recipients; $0.75:1 third-party recipients

Planning Highlights

High-growth businesses and new entrepreneurs are critical to southern Ontario's competitiveness as they help supply a continuous source of cutting-edge products, technologies, and services that can lead to long-term growth and prosperity. Despite the importance of entrepreneurship to the region's economy, many new entrepreneurs face barriers in raising adequate capital, finding mentors and developing the business skills they need to succeed, and accessing connections within investment communities. To address these challenges, the Agency launched Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) in 2010 to provide financial support to high-growth, early-stage businesses and help establish productive relationships with investors to improve their long-term outlook. Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) also supported the expansion of angel investment networks across southern Ontario.

Building on these successes, FedDev Ontario launched a second phase of the Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) initiative for 2014–15 under Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI), which aims to provide financial support to:

As the new Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) is an evolution of the previous Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) and Scientists and Engineers in Business (SEB) initiatives, FedDev Ontario will rely on historical knowledge and experience and existing relationships to help deliver results in 2014–15 and beyond. To achieve these results, the Agency has notionally allocated approximately $21 million and 6 FTEs to this sub-program to deliver projects with recipient groups. While the expectation is that the new Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) will result in a high number of small dollar-value projects, given the familiarity with the client groups and the types of projects, the Agency is anticipating that the level of resources required to administer it will remain the same.

In addition to the launch of the new Investing in Business Innovation (IBI), the Agency will work with recipients of the previous Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) initiative, ending on March 31, 2014, to track and report on performance, collect repayments, and successfully close files.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Business Productivity and Innovation

Description:

This sub-program provides repayable and non-repayable contributions to for-profit and not-for-profit corporations to help improve productivity of individual businesses, industry sectors, sub-regional economies and economic clusters so that southern Ontario can be more competitive. This sub-program is necessary as a number of studies have indicated that Ontario's productivity lags behind its U.S. counterparts. As a result, southern Ontario needs to increase productivity to remain competitive in the global economy.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
55,261,235 55,249,036 55,234,012
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
38 38 38
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 12
Southern Ontario businesses have enhanced capacity to support innovation, leading to improved productivity Number of projects receiving FDO support 50 2019–03–31
Ratio of dollars leveraged against FDO contributions 1.8:1

Planning Highlights

The competitiveness of the southern Ontario economy is increasingly dependent on its ability to attract new businesses, investment and jobs. The ability to be competitive also depends on its ability to support the continued need for productivity enhancements, greater market diversification and expansion, and better integration into global value chains. Providing support to established businesses and not-for-profit organizations that assist southern Ontario SMEs (i.e., southern Ontario industry associations and regional economic development organizations) in improving their productivity and global competitiveness will be a primary focus of the initiatives under this sub-program.

While the impacts of the 2008 economic downturn and structural challenges to the southern Ontario economy persist, tremendous opportunity exists for established businesses and not-for-profit organizations to play a key role in improving the region's competitiveness. FedDev Ontario developed two new initiatives starting in 2014–15 to address these challenges, which build on progress made under the Agency's earlier Prosperity Initiative that ended March 31, 2014.

The Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP) initiative will work with established SMEs to: expand their markets and facilities; increase their adoption of new technologies and processes to improve productivity; and increase business capacity to participate in global markets through market diversification/expansion and integration into global value chains. Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP) will also support not-for-profit organizations (i.e., southern Ontario industry associations and regional economic development organizations) that assist southern Ontario SMEs to improve their productivity and global competitiveness.

The Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD) initiative will complement this work by supporting not-for-profit regional and community economic development organizations to enhance business attraction, investment and employment opportunities in southern Ontario communities. Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD) will also work with these organizations to strengthen regional businesses and clusters with the goal of economic diversification and sustainability. The initiative will focus support toward projects that improve the circumstances of communities facing economic distress.

FedDev Ontario will also continue to advance its role as a champion in southern Ontario by taking advantage of national procurement opportunities on behalf of the region and promoting the capabilities of southern Ontario companies in order to engage potential Industrial Regional Benefits (IRB) contractors.

Further to these initiatives, FedDev Ontario will continue to provide Canadians with a single-window to information on starting a business, finding government financing programs, exporting, taxation and employee hiring through Canada Business Ontario (CBO), which is an Ontario member of the Canada Business Network. Through its online presence, call centre and outreach activities, Canada Business Ontario (CBO) will direct its Ontario clients to potential federal and provincial mechanisms that can assist with their business needs and support longer-term sustainability and growth.

Given that Investing in Business Growth and Productivity (IBGP) and Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD) are new initiatives, the Agency has little historical information to forecast expected results in 2014–15 or beyond. Nonetheless, in designing the two initiatives, the Agency conducted an analysis to determine the number of likely projects that would be eligible for funding under these initiatives. In allocating resources, the number of projects submitted and approved is one consideration while the complexity of projects is another.

The current target of fifty projects receiving support through these initiatives as well as dollars leveraged will be reported on annually and revised where appropriate based on actual results. The Agency has notionally allocated 38 FTEs to support the expected results of this sub-program area as well as to pursue its Investing in Regional Diversification (IRD) activities and operate Canada Business Ontario (CBO).

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Program 1.3: Community Economic Development

Description:

This program supports the 288 communities (small, large, rural, urban, Francophone and Aboriginal) in southern Ontario that are home to 12.4 million residents. These communities play a key role in enhancing southern Ontario's economic competitiveness and the long-term prosperity of the region. Southern Ontario depends on communities that can attract the best talent and compete for investment as dynamic centres of commerce and learning, and in turn, strong communities contribute to a prosperous southern Ontario. Through this program, the Agency supports communities and regions throughout southern Ontario to identify local solutions to local challenges and opportunities. Strong, safe and modern communities are essential building blocks for the region's competitiveness and long-term prosperity. FedDev Ontario will continue to work with others, including Infrastructure Canada, the Province and its communities to support infrastructure needs within southern Ontario.

Transfer payments in support of this program are made through a variety of initiatives under the authority of Community Futures Program (CFP), Economic Development Initiative (EDI), Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) and infrastructure programming like the Building Canada Fund. The Agency will support this program through the administration of contribution agreements with businesses, not-for-profit organizations, post-secondary institutions and municipalities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)Footnote 13
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
34,102,802 34,102,802 26,098,219 35,693,150
Human Resources (FTEs)Footnote 14
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
39 39 39
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Southern Ontario communities have strong economies able to sustain long-term economic development and growth Percentage of southern Ontario census sub-divisions (CSDs) with a decrease in employment insurance beneficiaries (year-over-year) 50% or more of southern Ontario CSDs have a decrease in employment insurance beneficiaries (year-over-year) 2015–03–31

Planning Highlights

Through its Community Economic Development Program, FedDev Ontario provides financial support to the 37 Community Futures Development Corporations (CFDCs) as well as businesses and not-for-profit organizations in Southern Ontario. This support aims to create new businesses and jobs and encourage economic diversification in local economies — particularly rural communities, communities in eastern Ontario, First Nations communities and official language minority communities (OLMCs) that face acute challenges.

With the continued support of its key stakeholders and partners, FedDev Ontario intends to focus efforts in 2014–15 on supporting the development, diversification, and long-term competitiveness of southern Ontario communities through the Community Futures Program (CFP), the recently renewed Economic Development Initiative (EDI), and Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP). With respect to Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP), the Agency will increase the focus of this program on long-term, strategic projects providing sustainable benefits for Eastern Ontario.

The Agency also intends to work with partners such as Infrastructure Canada and the provinces to deliver national programs and support projects that create and improve the infrastructure needed to enhance and diversify local communities across Ontario communities. More information on these sub-programs is set out in detail below.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Community Futures Program

Description:

The Community Futures Program (CFP) is a national program that provides funding to CFDCs so that they can help rural communities develop their local economy and long-term sustainability. CFDCs generally focus on the following four business lines: business loans, business counselling, strategic community planning and priorities and, community economic development projects. Rural southern Ontario continues to face persistent challenges: limited sources of capital for SMEs; consistently lower economic performance; declining number of available jobs; an aging workforce; and youth out-migration. Research has indicated that a region's prosperity is intricately linked to the economic well-being of rural communities.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
12,434,824 12,431,961 12,428,578
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
7 7 7
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 15
Rural communities in southern Ontario have strong economies to help respond to future economic challenges Number of businesses in rural southern Ontario that have been created, maintained, or expanded as a result of Community Futures Program (CFP) funding 4,200 2015–03–31
Number of jobs created or maintained in rural southern Ontario communities as a result of Community Futures Program (CFP) funding 8,800
Ratio of funds raised from other sources to Community Futures Program (CFP) investments 3.6:1

Planning Highlights

In 2014–15, FedDev Ontario will work collaboratively with CFDCs across southern Ontario to continue the transformation of the program. In particular, the Agency will focus efforts on assessing the effectiveness of its new performance-based funding model, which was implemented in 2013–14, and will experience its first full year of implementation in 2014–15. The new model uses key indicators to assess performance, provides incentives to maximize operational efficiencies and supports excellence in program delivery. During 2014–15, the Community Futures Program (CFP) will also continue working with key stakeholders to assess whether the new performance enhancements have met expectations and helped southern Ontario communities to better respond to economic circumstances. The Community Futures Program (CFP) will also work towards enhancing its partnerships and integration with the Ontario Network for Entrepreneurs. For example, it has initiated a pilot project with Venture Niagara and the Small Business Enterprise Centre in St. Catharines, Ontario to identify opportunities for facilitating and coordinating business services to SMEs. The aforementioned pilot is one of many other efforts that will be implemented throughout the year to support CFDCs in southern Ontario.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Eastern Ontario Development Program

Description:

This sub-program aims at promoting socio-economic development in rural eastern Ontario, leading to a competitive and diversified regional economy and sustainable, self-reliant communities. Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) non-repayable contributions are available through fifteen eastern CFDC's and the Eastern Ontario Community Futures Development Corporation Network Inc. (EOCFDC Network) to support projects in two key areas: business development and community innovation.

The economic challenges facing rural eastern Ontario have been exacerbated in recent years as a result of the global recession and the pressures facing the manufacturing sector. Facing new economic realities, the region is continuing to undergo adjustments, restructuring, and related challenges. Eastern Ontario's relatively large rural working age population is characterized by a higher share of older workers, and the region's youth are leaving the area for other opportunities. Furthermore, the economic hardship felt by workers, families and communities in this region is reflected in its relatively lower wages and household incomes, a lower labour force participation, and a higher proportion of people receiving employment insurance benefits when compared to Ontario overall.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
10,071,520 10,069,297 10,066,558
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
4 4 4
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 16
Eastern Ontario communities have strong economies able to respond to future economic challenges Number of businesses and organizations supported in eastern Ontario communities participating in Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) 6,180 2019–03–31
Number of FTEs created and maintained in eastern Ontario communities participating in Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) 3,000
Ratio of funds raised from other sources to federal Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) investments 1:1 2015–03–31

Planning Highlights

The Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP), renewed in Budget 2013, is an economic development initiative focused on addressing economic challenges in eastern Ontario and taking advantage of innovative opportunities in the region. Since its inception in 2004, this successful program has been renewed several times. To date, the Agency has invested over $80 million through 7,636 business and community development projects. This has led to additional support of $345.6 million from partners such as local businesses, municipalities and the Government of Ontario. The five-year renewal of the program, effective April 1, 2014, is expected to result in more strategic, long-term economic development investments and collaborative projects that will benefit eastern Ontario businesses and communities. Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) also advances economic growth in rural eastern Ontario communities by encouraging new project development, funding strategic/planning studies, mobilizing community stakeholders, and supporting the formation of partnerships that lead to competitive and sustainable local economies.

In 2014–15, Eastern Ontario Development Program (EODP) will continue to work with eastern Ontario CFDCs to focus efforts on supporting projects that promote the growth of new and existing businesses and advance community-led economic development to diversify local economies. It will also support collaborative economic development projects through the EOCFDC Network to demonstrate benefits to multiple communities and strengthen linkages between urban and rural areas. Given that many challenges and opportunities in eastern Ontario cross-cut communities, a third project category is available to support regional projects. These projects are intended to be strategic, large and regional.

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Sub-Program 1.3.3: Official Language Minority Communities (OLMC)

Description:

This sub-program includes a national program—Economic Development Initiative (EDI)—which provides funding to Francophone and bilingual organizations to help create jobs and economic and sustainable growth in Francophone communities. Economic Development Initiative (EDI) focuses on providing funding for community strategic planning initiatives and business and economic development initiatives. This sub-program is necessary to help ensure the long-term economic growth and sustainability of OLMCs in southern Ontario. It is also part of the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–2018.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
1,074,050 1,074,050 1,074,050
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
1 1 1
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 17
OLMCs have access to economic opportunities to help build strong communities Number of projects funded under the Economic Development Initiative (EDI) 5 2015–03–31
Number of partnerships established as a result of Economic Development Initiative (EDI) funding 5
Dollar value leveraged as a result of Economic Development Initiative (EDI) funding $575,000

Planning Highlights

Economic Development Initiative (EDI) was renewed in 2013 as part of the renewal of the Government of Canada's Roadmap for Canada's Official Languages 2013–2018. Economic Development Initiative (EDI) aims to enhance the vitality of OLMCs in southern Ontario through financial support to businesses and communities.

Southern Ontario has the largest Francophone minority community population in all of Canada. In 2014–15, the Agency will re-launch the program and focus efforts on encouraging projects involving youth, newcomers, and business counselling. The Agency will also seek to capitalize on linking these investments to accessing diverse markets.

Sub-Program 1.3.4: Infrastructure Delivery

Description:

This sub-program includes the delivery of funding on behalf of other government departments and/or in partnerships with other orders of government to provide assistance to not-for-profit, private and public sector entities for a range of infrastructure priority areas. This sub-program includes infrastructure investments that help support a prosperous economy for Ontario and Canada by maintaining and continuing to attract highly skilled workers, businesses, and investors. It also supports innovation in various industries, particularly the construction sector, by promoting modernization, the implementation of new technologies and the acceleration of product development to market, thereby positioning the province and the country to better compete in the global, knowledge-based economy.

Over the years, FedDev Ontario has been asked to deliver national infrastructure programs and work with partners to address the infrastructure needs of the region. While a large number of initiatives introduced under Canada's Economic Action Plan (2009) have successfully concluded, some of the longer-term initiatives continue to provide funding for ongoing projects across the province.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
9,463,390 1,464,127 11,065,754
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
12 12 12
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be AchievedFootnote 18
Southern Ontario infrastructure is able to support future economic development and growth Number of infrastructure projects funded and/or administered by the Agency 362 2015–03–31
Number of completed infrastructure projects funded and/or administered by the Agency 294
Funds leveraged from other sources through infrastructure programming funded and/ or administered by the Agency 1:1

Planning Highlights

As part of its work to support the needs of southern Ontario communities, FedDev Ontario partners with other government organizations such as Infrastructure Canada and the Government of Ontario to deliver Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC) throughout Ontario. The BCF-CC provides funding to communities with less than 100,000 people, focusing on projects that meet the environmental, economic, and quality-of-life objectives of citizens across southern Ontario, including water quality, wastewater improvements, public transit, local roads, and other types of community infrastructure.

In 2014–15, FedDev Ontario intends to focus efforts on strengthening key partnerships with other federal departments and will continue to work closely with the provincial government, municipalities, First Nations and other stakeholders to support investments in public infrastructure priorities across Ontario. The Agency will also identify opportunities to increase efficiencies by aligning best practices and processes across multiple infrastructure programs.

Moving forward, the Agency will support projects such as the Massey Hall Revitalization that was announced in Budget 2013. With an investment of $8 million in 2014–15, the revitalization work will contribute to a modern facility with increased productivity improvements that will help to attract many of the world's leading performers, businesses and highly-skilled workers to the region, while providing an important venue for concerts and events and supporting the work of current and future artists.

During 2014–15, the Agency will undertake administrative close-out activities and reporting requirements related to programs ending March 31, 2014, including CIIF, the Canada–Ontario Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (COMRIF), and the Municipal Rural Infrastructure Fund (MRIF) Top-up. The Agency will also continue to monitor and report on the status of projects that received repayable contributions under the Community Adjustment Fund (CAF) in previous years and will also continue to administer the Brantford Brownfield Remediation project by allocating $9.6 million in funding in 2016–17 to respond to community needs.

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Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related enabling functions, activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Material Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
15,845,887 15,845,887 15,842,389 15,838,081
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
109 109 109

Planning Highlights

With the launch of FedDev Ontario's next five-year mandate the Agency will continue to evolve and improve its internal support functions by building on lessons learned and best practices identified through work with other government departments and agencies, including its regional development agency (RDA) counterparts.

In 2014–15, FedDev Ontario's Internal Service activities will continue to support the Agency in delivering its transfer payment programs by supporting both the close-out of legacy programs and helping to ease the transition to the next five years. Specific activities will include strong financial planning and human resource support to address any potential capacity issues and ensure that the Agency's workforce is engaged and continually maturing.

FedDev Ontario will also continue its efforts to be visible, accessible and accountable both to Parliamentarians and the Canadian public; the Agency will promote its new programming suite through a series of public announcements, news releases, and the use of social media platforms. The Agency will also continue to engage with local communities and stakeholders through participation in conferences, trade shows and speaking events. Through engagement and transparency on its role, plans, priorities, and results, the Agency will continue to establish a strong profile across southern Ontario and work to attract high-quality projects.

Building the region's capacity as a centre of knowledge in 2014–15 will also be a focus of the Agency's internal service areas. This will be achieved by undertaking strategic research, data collection, analysis, and consultations while also continuing to explore opportunities to develop forums and mechanisms to enhance coordination and collaboration efforts. This will support the Agency's efforts to champion the interests of southern Ontario and convene key stakeholders in order to deliver results in support of its strategic outcome.

Addressing internal efficiencies and optimizing internal operations will also be of critical importance to FedDev Ontario in 2014–15. Given that the Agency is headquartered outside of the National Capital Region, it will continue to explore technological solutions like tele-presence and videoconferencing to reduce expenditures and leverage expertise through strategic relationships and knowledge-sharing to support consistency and avoid duplication of effort.

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Footnotes

Footnote 4

Program description was updated to include the new initiatives which will be delivered under SOPI authority in 2014–15.

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Footnote 5

Planned spending at the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as expenditures will be incurred for program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

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Footnote 6

The FTE total for the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as FTEs were attributed to program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

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Footnote 7

As 2014–15 is the first year of the newly-launched Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI) and the Advanced Manufacturing Fund (AMF), the Agency is utilizing longer-term targets to measure performance against its expected results to reflect the anticipated performance over the lifespan of its initiatives. FedDev Ontario will report yearly on incremental progress against these targets.

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Footnote 8

Program description was updated to include the new initiatives which will be delivered under SOPI authority in 2014–15.

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Footnote 9

Planned spending at the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as expenditures will be incurred for program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

Return to footnote 9 referrer

Footnote 10

The FTE total for the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as FTEs were attributed to program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

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Footnote 11

As 2014–15 is the first year of the newly-launched Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI), the Agency is utilizing longer-term targets to measure performance against its expected results to reflect the anticipated performance over the lifespan of its initiatives. FedDev Ontario will report yearly on incremental progress against these targets.

Return to footnote 11 referrer

Footnote 12

As 2014–15 is the first year of the newly-launched Southern Ontario Prosperity Initiatives (SOPI), the Agency is utilizing longer-term targets to measure performance against its expected results to reflect the anticipated performance over the lifespan of its initiatives. FedDev Ontario will report yearly on incremental progress against these targets.

Return to footnote 12 referrer

Footnote 13

Planned spending at the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as expenditures will be incurred for program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

Return to footnote 13 referrer

Footnote 14

The FTE total for the program level is greater than the sum of all related sub-programs as FTEs were attributed to program level activities that supported more than one sub-program.

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Footnote 15

Given the ongoing nature of the Community Futures Program, performance will continue to be assessed against annual targets as in previous years.

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Footnote 16

Given the five-year renewal of the Eastern Ontario Development Program, the Agency is utilizing longer-term targets to measure performance against its expected results to reflect the anticipated performance over its lifespan. Given that ratios are not measured cumulatively, the third performance indicator will continue to use an annual target. FedDev Ontario will report yearly on incremental progress against these targets.

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Footnote 17

Given the nature of the program, performance will be assessed against annual targets as in previous years.

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Footnote 18

Given the ongoing nature of the Agency's infrastructure delivery activities, performance will continue to be assessed against annual targets as in previous years.

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