Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program –
Frequently Asked Questions


General

1. What is the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program?

Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program (CIP 150), being delivered by regional development agencies across the country, is part of the federal government’s approach to celebrating Canada’s 150th anniversary of Confederation in 2017.

The $300-million national program supports the renovation, expansion and improvement of existing community and cultural infrastructure, including projects that support the Government's priorities to ensure a better future for Indigenous peoples and promote a clean growth economy.

The application process for CIP 150 is now completed.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q1

2. How much funding was available for projects?

There was significant interest in the program with more than 2,100 applications.

The CIP 150 in southern Ontario consisted of two application intakes. More than 730 projects have been approved under the program.

Under Intake One, over 380 projects were funded for up to $44.4 million. With the addition of $44.4 million in supplementary funding announced in Budget 2016, the total CIP 150 allocation for southern Ontario, to be delivered by FedDev Ontario, is up to $88.8 million.  Under Intake Two, over 350 projects are being funded.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q2

3. When do projects need to be completed?

All construction must be substantially completed and eligible project costs incurred by March 31, 2018.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q3

4. Is this a permanent program?

No. This short-term program is a component of the Government of Canada’s longer-term infrastructure plan intended to better meet the needs of Canadians and better position Canada's economy for the future.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q4

5. How does the program benefit southern Ontario communities?

The 150th anniversary of Confederation is a time to celebrate the places, like community centres, museums, parks and arenas, where families can play together, where neighbours can meet, and where Canadians can celebrate the many cultures that make Canada so diverse. CIP 150 is helping to make our communities inclusive, while making important investments to advance a clean growth economy.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q5

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Funded Projects

6. My project was approved, what are the next steps?

FedDev Ontario will work with funded recipients to finalize a contribution agreement that outlines the approved project funding; the scope of work; claims and reporting procedures; environmental mitigation measures (if applicable); as well as other program requirements including communications and signage and ensuring that any duty to consult or environmental assessment requirements are addressed.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q6

7. When can I announce my project?

All communications activities need to be coordinated with FedDev Ontario’s communications branch.  For more information, please refer to the communications requirements for details.

As funding is conditional on the completion and signing of a contribution agreement, recipients are asked to return signed contributions as soon as possible so that announcements can proceed.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q7

8. When can projects begin and when do projects need to be completed?

As per the CIP 150 program guidelines, project costs incurred as of April 1, 2016, are eligible for financial assistance.

Projects are to be completed and project costs incurred by March 31, 2018.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q8

9. Why weren't my other projects funded?

The demand was far greater than the total funding available for the program. Under Intake Two, FedDev Ontario received more than 1,000 applications.

As part of the Budget 2016 commitment, up to $44.4 million was available for projects in southern Ontario under Intake Two; therefore, not all projects could be selected for funding.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q9

10. What costs are eligible for funding?

Eligible costs under the program are identified in the program guidelines.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q10

11. What costs are not eligible for funding?

Costs that are not eligible costs under the program are identified in the program guidelines.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q11

12. How does the Government of Canada flow funding to recipients?

Only eligible project costs incurred between April 1, 2016, and March 31, 2018, will be reimbursed. All other costs are solely the responsibility of the recipient.

Once a fully signed contribution agreement is executed, in order to be reimbursed for project expenses, the approved recipient must first pay the cost of the service or good, then submit a claim, including supporting documentation certifying that the cost has been incurred and paid for by the recipient. FedDev Ontario then reimburses eligible costs on the percentage basis specified in the contribution agreement.

Contributions are subject to performance conditions specified in the contribution agreement and funding recipients are required to report to FedDev Ontario on results achieved.

Please visit the claims page for further information.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q12

13. How does the Government of Canada ensure appropriate accountability for the use of public funds?

Approved projects are monitored by FedDev Ontario and recipients are required to report on project activities and outcomes as per the terms and conditions of signed contribution agreements.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q13

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Project Approval

14. What priorities were taken into consideration during the assessment of applications?

Projects were assessed based on eligibility requirements and priority areas outlined in the program guidelines including:

  • Project readiness;
  • Project scope;
  • Extent to which other funding is leveraged;
  • Extent to which project supports a clean growth economy; and
  • Link to Canada's 150th Anniversary of Confederation.
http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q14

15. I met all the eligibility and selection criteria. Why didn't I get funded?

The demand was far greater than the total funding available for the program. Under Intake Two, FedDev Ontario received more than 1,000 applications.

As part of the Budget 2016 commitment, up to $44.4 million was available for projects in southern Ontario under Intake Two; therefore, not all projects could be selected for funding.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q15

16. Can I receive feedback, verbal or written, on our application?

Projects were assessed based on the eligibility and selection criteria in the program guidelines, which were communicated when the program was launched. All applicants have been informed of decisions in writing.

Given the high volume of applicants, feedback on specific applications will not be provided.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q16

17. Is there an appeal process?

No, there is no appeal process through the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program.

FedDev Ontario reserves the right to make the final determination on the value of the contributions and to exclude expenditures deemed to be ineligible or outside the scope of the project.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q17

Other

18. What else is the Government of Canada doing to support infrastructure?

CIP 150 is one of several infrastructure-related initiatives that the Government of Canada has undertaken to generate well-being and prosperity across Canada.

In Budget 2016, the Government of Canada proposed a two-phase plan to better meet the needs of Canadians and better position Canada's economy for the future.

Phase 1 of this plan is already at work in our communities—supporting vital repairs to our aging pipes and roads, helping communities improve social housing, and allowing transit organizations to replace 70-year-old signaling systems.

But this is only the first step. The Government of Canada will provide more than $180 billion over 12 years for public transit, green and social infrastructure, trade and transportation, as well as rural and northern communities.

This plan provides unprecedented levels of funding for projects across the country—projects that will help create long-term economic growth, build inclusive, sustainable communities, and support a low carbon, green economy.

http://www.feddevontario.gc.ca/eic/site/723.nsf/eng/02204.html#q18

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